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Meet Georgia Scott, the TikToker starting a conversation about stammering

Discover how something as simple as a Maccies Drive Thru has educated thousands

Written by Liv Grady

January 24, 2022

georgia scott with a tiktok logo in top corner

Inspirational woman alert: 🚨. Let us introduce you to Georgia Scott, the woman who is starting an important conversation about stammering.

In case you didn’t already know, stammering/stuttering means the same thing and it is a neurological condition. Georgia developed her stammer at the age of 5 and she now uses her TikTok page to share her journey and uplift her followers along the way.

Her TikTok journey started in September last year, when she posted a video of herself ordering at a McDonald’s Drive Thru. The clip quickly made it to the FYP, reaching thousands of people in a matter of days.

@ge0rgiatalks the dreaded drive thru as a person who stammers.. #stammering #stuttering #stammeringawareness #stutteringawareness #mcdonaldsdrivethru #mcdonalds ♬ original sound – ge0rgiatalks

For many fluent people, ordering food might not seem like a big deal, but for someone with a stammer, these situations can be overwhelming.

With one simple video, Georgia started a dialogue with the TikTok audience, alerting thousands to the struggles that the stammering community face every day.

Following the success of her first video, Georgia continued to create TikToks, answering questions from her followers, challenging herself to new situations and more.

If you do one thing today, go follow her, right now. Inspirational content coming your way ⬇️⬇️⬇️

@ge0rgiatalks

♬ original sound – ge0rgiatalks

GEORGIA SCOTT Q+A

What gave you the idea to make your first drive through video?

I was going through a rough patch, I was really struggling with my speech and found myself avoiding certain things (like ordering my own food) and I just thought, for what? Why am I struggling like this? For what? I thought, I might as well help at least one person through this struggle. I recorded my first drive thru on a bit of a whim, not really expecting much! I just wanted at least one person to resonate with me and feel seen, because I didn’t have that when I was younger.

“I just wanted at least one person to resonate with me and feel seen, because I didn’t have that when I was younger.”

Georgia Scott on the reason behind creating her first Drive Thru video

What are some misconceptions that people have about stammers?      

  • “People stammer/stutter because they are nervous”

This isn’t true. Yes, fluent speakers can occasionally become more disfluent when they are nervous or under stress. This is not the same as somebody who has a stammer/stutter. People assume that it must be the same reason. Whilst people who stammer may be anxious/nervous, it is not the cause of stammering. Stammering is a neurological condition.

  • “People who stammer are shy”

Not necessarily. Sometimes we are just hesitant to speak up.

  • “People who stammer are less intelligent”

 Tell that to the doctors, scientists, writers and university lectures who I’ve met, who all stammer! People who stammer have achieved great success and it has nothing to do with intelligence.

georgia scott smiling at camera

How have the people of TikTok reacted to your videos?

I cant believe the reaction.  I didn’t think so many people would be interested! I get thousands of lovely, supportive comments, people who are really rooting for me. I’m also surprised by the amount of questions I get asked, it makes me so happy that people want to educate themselves on stammering. The more people are educated, the less negative experiences people who stammer will have (e.g – being laughed at).

“It makes me so happy that people want to educate themselves on stammering. The more people are educated, the less negative experiences people who stammer will have.”

Georgia Scott

How has the success of your videos impacted your confidence?

I still have my bad days. I still struggle with my mental health (stammering has a huge impact on this). But knowing I have an audience, a platform, and a voice, has gotten me out of bed on my bad days. I say to myself ‘if you won’t do it for yourself, do it for the people of tiktok!’ It’s challenging me every day and helping me grow. I’m very grateful.

What advice would you give your younger self?

First, I’d give her a hug. It still makes me sad to think about. I’d want to promise her that it gets better. Life gets better, it becomes exciting, rewarding, but only if you keep on going and never give up. I wish I could have given her an ounce of self-belief.

What situations do you struggle with your stammer the most?

It’s different for every person who stammers, some may be the same as me, some are the complete opposite.

I personally find 1-1, quiet environments the most challenging. Like going to the doctors, work meetings and the post office.

Phone calls are a big one too, that lack of eye contact makes things difficult, especially if I’m blocking on a word (it could be a completely silent block if I’m really struggling to speak) , the other person can’t see what’s going on.

I find being in a loud environment like a bar, much easier, because I can project my voice more, and this really helps me.

georgia scott mirror selfie

When did you first realise you had developed a stammer?

I developed a stammer at the age of 5. From quite young on I had NHS speech therapy, up until I was a teenager. I hated going, I hated talking, especially when it was about my speech. I tried various other therapies, none of which I wanted to do, so it wasn’t a surprise they didn’t work for me. I didn’t believe anything could help me. It was almost like I had given up with everything completely, before I had even tried, because that’s how much of a bad headspace I was in.

I had no confidence, self-esteem and had a lot of dark thoughts growing up. My last resort, I joined the McGuire Programme when I was 17, and that is what helped me on my journey, a course run by other people who stammer, teaching physical and psychological techniques to help fight back against the negative thoughts/feeling surrounding having a stammer, and to gain a good level of control. That programme taught me what true self-belief is, for the first time ever.

Georgia making her tiktok video
Georgia making her tiktok video

Every day is tough, its an ongoing battle to not let it hold me back and stop me from doing the things that I want to do. Some days I do still let it win and get the better of me, but I believe we all have bad days, it’s part of the parcel. I have a strong support network around me, which I’m lucky to have.

My mindset is different now compared to when I was younger, stammering is a huge part of me, and I’ve accepted that in ways I did not think was possible. It’s what makes me, me.

“My mindset is different now compared to when I was younger, stammering is a huge part of me, and I’ve accepted that in ways I did not think was possible. It’s what makes me, me.”

Georgia Scott

How can we support someone with a stammer in conversation?

  • Maintain natural eye contact & listen
  • Please don’t interrupt or try and finish our sentences (this can be really unhelpful if you get the word wrong!)
  • Don’t give advice. We live with a stammer every day, we don’t need to hear ‘just slow down’ or ‘relax’
  • For friends & family, if you know somebody is struggling (especially mentally) try and support them in the best way you can. Talking about the psychological affects stammering has, can be difficult, and they probably bottle a lot up. Remind them that you’re there for them, willing to listen at any time and can reach out for help.

If you want to learn more about stammering, head to Stamma.org for resources, information and more.

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